Lord of the Flies

Lord of the Flies - In William Golding's novel, Lord of the...

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Unformatted text preview: In William Golding's novel, Lord of the Flies, the boys face many conflicts, including conflicts within themselves and among each other. As the boys spend more time on the secluded island, they forget their civilized identities and resort to primordial, barbaric behavior. Tensions grow amongst the boys as they struggle for power and lose sight of the rational lifestyle of civilized humanity. Corruption and conflict emerge in the boys' makeshift civilization and all order and government begin to fail as the boys face troubling situations which even adults would find life changing. Golding shows that without civilization, man will revert to savagery. From the time Ralph is voted chief of the boys, Jack develops extreme jealousy toward him and envies his position of power; as a result, a struggle for power between the two boys manifests, which help foster the beginnings of a defective society. Ralph symbolizes the order of society, as displayed by his constant reiteration of the rules and requirements the boys are asked to comply...
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This note was uploaded on 01/25/2012 for the course ENG Eng135 taught by Professor Dean during the Spring '11 term at DeVry Addison.

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Lord of the Flies - In William Golding's novel, Lord of the...

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