01_BUSWRITE_CH_01[1] - I P A R T P A R T LEARNING BUSINESS...

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Unformatted text preview: I P A R T P A R T LEARNING BUSINESS WRITING BASICS KPL-BUSWRITE-07-1201-001.indd 1 KPL-BUSWRITE-07-1201-001.indd 1 2/1/08 8:07:39 PM 2/1/08 8:07:39 PM KPL-BUSWRITE-07-1201-001.indd 2 KPL-BUSWRITE-07-1201-001.indd 2 2/1/08 8:07:40 PM 2/1/08 8:07:40 PM Understanding Business Writing B usiness writing integrates key elements of other approaches to writing, but successful business writers choose these elements carefully, always with an eye toward the audience. Successful busi- ness writers consider issues of punctuation, organization, voice, lay- out, and adequate support for each specifi c message, along with a precise balance among these strategies. Time is of the essence. The bottom line in business writing: Everyone is busy, and no one wants another thing to read. But writing (documentation, reporting, correspondence, communication, presentation-support materials) still fuels the engine of business; to succeed as business writers, we must balance the foundational role of writing with the reality that people are too busy to read what we write. Within this text are the tools to eff ect that balance. W H A T ’ S A H E A D W H A T ’ S A H E A D Identifying the essential elements of business writing Distinguishing business writ- ing from other approaches to writing Negotiating the confl icting goals of business writing versus business reading ∙ ∙ ∙ Reading versus seeing Mechanics, tone, and design ∙ ∙ 1 C H A P T E R C H A P T E R KPL-BUSWRITE-07-1201-001.indd 3 KPL-BUSWRITE-07-1201-001.indd 3 2/1/08 8:07:40 PM 2/1/08 8:07:40 PM 4 PART I: LEARNING BUSINESS WRITING BASICS KEY CONCEPTS Readers of this text will most likely fi nd themselves in one of the following circumstances: In business: already working, trying hard to climb the ladder toward further success In school: immersed in academics, with an eye toward mov- ing into a profession or continuing your education In another fi eld: working in public service, academics, the law, science and technology, government, retail or other serv- ice industries, or some combination of these fi elds I’ve listed below key concepts with which we must begin our “adventures” in business writing: Audience Th e people who will read the text. Because written text generally remains accessible beyond the short term, a successful business writer must consider both the immediate or primary audience (those people whom the reader can clearly predict will access the document) as well as the extended or secondary audience (those people who might seek out or happen upon the text for guidance, validation, reference, or replication). Bottom Line Th e most important items or elements in the text. Bottom lines are generally forward-looking and involve issues of actionability, application, impact, and immediate value. Bottom lines always em- phasize reader over writer....
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This note was uploaded on 01/26/2012 for the course BUSINESS Accounting taught by Professor N/a during the Spring '11 term at Kaplan University.

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01_BUSWRITE_CH_01[1] - I P A R T P A R T LEARNING BUSINESS...

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