Chapter 1 - What is Cog

Chapter 1 - What is Cog - Im an observer, I like to watch...

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Cognitive Psychology – what the heck is that? “I’m an observer, I like to watch people. I’m into psychology and people; how they act and such.” – Dane Cook
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What is Cognitive Psychology Loosely defined as the study of how we perceive, think, and act . Domains of Cognitive Psychology Include: Perception Memory Language Motor Control Decision-Making Attention Categorization In short, Cognitive Psychology includes a lot of ‘stuff’ and it is nearly impossible to take it all in. Thus, scientists ask specific questions (e.g., how does visual perception work)……. However, these questions are deeply tied to assumptions made about the mind and humanity .
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Why Make Assumption? It’s nearly impossible not to Example: where are memories stored? Two “ BIG ” Assumptions (we’ll come back to this later*) 1. What are the important questions? Is memory meaningless w/o understanding perception 1. How do beliefs affect ideas? Inverse projection problem Indirect vs. direct perception (we’ll discuss more later)
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Early Philosophers and the Mind Ancient Greeks: Reason (Rationalism) : Espoused by Plato , asserts that knowledge can only be obtained through introspection (logical thought, mathematics). ‘reality is in the abstract concept’ Empiricism : espoused by Aristotle , asserts that knowledge can only be obtained through experience (observation). ‘reality is in the world’ Coincidentally, Plato also proposed that visual perception occurred when the eye emitted some sort of beam, which then connected with an object and was reflected back Plato & Aristotle – in a fresco by Raphael
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The Assumptions From the early Greeks: 1. The world can be understood and predicted because it is systematic (would be formalized as determinism* ) 2. Humans are part of this world and can be understood in the same way as other physical objects (this gets “ lost ” during the dark ages) 3. Explanations should be grounded in events in the world rather than magic (would be formalized as positivism and later logical positivism ) Job and his diseases, Lazarus and his coma There are cause and effect relationships Our great gift as humans is o and the growth of it through Greeks were concentrating o physical rather than the me (God) There are cause and effect relationships Our great gift as humans is o and the growth of it through Greeks were concentrating o physical rather than the me (God) ue ue There is some physical change that occurs that leads people to diseases There is some physical change that occurs that leads people to diseases
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Ways of Knowing Science Attempts to discover truths through objective evidence independent of our own opinion Properties of Science 1. experiences and phenomena are publicly verifiable (i.e., we can all observe the same thing). 2.
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2012 for the course PSY 293 taught by Professor Dr.hall during the Spring '09 term at Miami University.

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Chapter 1 - What is Cog - Im an observer, I like to watch...

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