Paper 2 Business Ethics

Paper 2 Business Ethics - Big Brother Treads a Fine Line By...

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“Big Brother” Treads a Fine Line By Julie Kluck December 3, 2011 Ethical or Unethical? Everyone has heard the saying, “Big Brother is watching you,” but what does that imply? It insinuates that the government or any public entity is using the sophisticated technology that we humans immensely idolize to track our every move. The United States government and business entities are testing programs to possibly implement that will allow them to know our driving and/or walking routes, our places of destination, our shopping habits, and not to mention all of our personal information. This personal information can be your marital status, income level, and banking and credit information; just to name a few. If the government and business entities wanted to, they could even track the type of clothes you own and what type of dollar bills you are in possession of. Some people do not mind being “watched,” while others are downright appalled and feel that this is an invasion of their privacy. Or better yet, it defies the Fourth Amendment. There is a very fine line that distinguishes the difference between what is permitted and what is prohibited. Or what is ethical or unethical. One can easily cross this line and slip into what is legal or illegal territory. In this controversial topic we will identify some of the new techniques associated with modern technology that the government and business entities are testing, such as the mobile phone tracking system and using a Global Positioning System (GPS) to track your car. The Fourth Amendment First, we will discuss the rights of the Fourth Amendment - “Search and Seizure” - of the Bill of Rights within the United States Constitution. It states that ( http://www.infoworld.com/security/us-senator- demands-suspension-of -phone-tracking-system):
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The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. In analyzing the Fourth Amendment one would discover that it has three components: It establishes a right to privacy: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects.” It protects United States citizen’s right to privacy by prohibiting “unreasonable searches and seizures” or are not authorized by a warrant based upon probable cause. No warrant can be issued to a law enforcement officer until it describes in detail "the
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2012 for the course FIN 350 taught by Professor Alahassanediallo during the Fall '08 term at Eastern Michigan University.

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Paper 2 Business Ethics - Big Brother Treads a Fine Line By...

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