Electrocardiogram

Electrocardiogram - Electrocardiogram The electrocardiogram...

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Electrocardiogram The electrocardiogram is a recording of the combined action potentials of the nodal and myocardial cells at the surface of the skin. This electrical activity is usually detected, amplified and recorded by electrodes located on the arms, legs and chest. An EKG recording has characteristic wave forms that have been named and described. (See Figure 8). The P wave is the firing of the SA node resulting in atrial depolarization. Depolarization of the atria will result in atrial contraction (which is NOT measured on the EKG). The next measurement is the QRS complex. During the QRS, the AV node fires, the ventricles depolarize, and the atria repolarize. At this time, the atria relax and the ventricles will begin to contract (NOT measured on the EKG). The last deflection of the EKG is the T wave, when the ventricles repolarize and then relax (relaxation NOT measured on the EKG). Figure 8
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Electrocardiogram - Electrocardiogram The electrocardiogram...

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