Physics I Lab Manual 2011 58

Physics I Lab Manual 2011 58 - EXPERIMENT 7. FRICTION 10....

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Unformatted text preview: EXPERIMENT 7. FRICTION 10. Repeat the above procedure testing different surfaces of the block: the large and small wooden surfaces and the large felt surface in contact with the paper for one set of measurements. Analysis Enter your data into excel. Using a separate worksheet for each block surface, labeled appropriately, complete the following analysis 1. Plot the average force of static friction and the average force of kinetic friction versus the normal force on the cart (both should be on the same plot). Give your plot an appropriate title, axes labels indicating units and any other formatting necessary for it to be easily understood. 2. Fit a line to the data using the “add trendline” option. Record the slope of the line this is the value of the coefficient of friction for the particular type of friction (static or kinetic) being plotted. 3. From your uncertainty in the force of friction with the cart fully loaded, estimate δf the uncertainty in the coefficient of friction from δµ ≈ mg (note this neglects the uncertainty in the mass because the total uncertainty will be dominated by δf ) 4. Print out your graphs and record on each the measured coefficients of kinetic and static friction, along with their associated uncertainty. 5. Do your measured values for µs between the large and small wood surfaces on the table agree with each other within the experimental uncertainty? Do they differ from the coefficient of static friction observed in the experiments with the felt surfaces? Which surface had the higher value for the coefficient of static friction? 6. Was the measured value of the coefficient of kinetic friction less than that of static friction for each surface being considered? If not postulate a reason why it wasn’t. 48 ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2012 for the course PHY 2048l taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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