Intercellular Junctions

Intercellular Junctions - Intercellular Junctions All cells...

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Intercellular Junctions All cells in the body, except blood cells, are anchored by intercellular junctions. These junctions form between individual cells or between cells and the surrounding ECM (recall the adhesion proteins). There are three types of intercellular junctions: desmosomes, tight junctions and gap junctions. Desmosomes are a protein patch between two cells that holds them together against mechanical stressors. These junctions can be considered CONNECTING junctions and are sometimes called adhesion junctions, reflecting this function. Tight junctions are found completely around the cell and join it to surrounding cells forming a BARRIER that prevents substances and bacteria from passing between cells; thus tight junction are protective. Gap junctions span the membrane between two cells forming a water-filled channel between the cells through which small solutes can pass. These intercellular junctions allow for COMMUNICATION between adjacent cells. Glands
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Intercellular Junctions - Intercellular Junctions All cells...

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