Muscle Metabolism

Muscle Metabolism - Muscle Metabolism ATP Synthesis All...

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Muscle Metabolism ATP Synthesis All muscular contraction depends upon the presence of ATP. ATP can be made in the muscle cells either anaerobically or aerobically . The immediate energy needs of a muscle are supplied by 1) the ATP already present in the cytoplasm, 2) the ATP that can be made by the mitochondria aerobically using the oxygen stored in myoglobin, and 3) the transfer of a phosphate group from a carrier molecule to ADP -- the phosphagen system. The enzyme myokinase transfers P i from one ADP to another ADP, converting the latter to ATP. Another enzyme, creatine kinase, obtains P i from creatine phosphate and gives it to ADP to make ATP. After the removal of the phosphate, the remaining creatine can combine together to form creatinine, which is excreted by the urinary system. Short-term energy needs exhaust the phosphagen system, but the cardiovascular system is not delivering enough oxygen to allow aerobic respiration to take place. For this brief amount of time, the glycogen-lactic acid system (anaerobic fermentation) takes over. Muscles obtain
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course BSC BSC1085 taught by Professor Sharonsimpson during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Muscle Metabolism - Muscle Metabolism ATP Synthesis All...

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