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Lecture 12 Genomics - BIOC 212 EXAM II Fall term 2011...

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BIOC 212 EXAM II Fall term 2011 GENOMICS Professor Ruthann Nichols LECTURE 7 Wed, Nov 2 Chapter 27, pp. 846-857 Problem Set 6 is due Mon, Nov 7th, 2:10 pm; Discussion 2:10-2:45 pm EXAM REVIEW II Mon, Nov 7th, 2:45-4 pm, 3330 MSI Review (continued), Mon, Nov 7th, 4:10-6 pm, 3330 MSI SPECIAL LECTURE by Dr. Michael Pape is Tues, Nov 8th, 11:10 am-12N, 3330 MSI. Exam II is Wed, Nov 9th, 2:10-4 pm, 3330 MSI Ruthann Nichols; 2:30-4:30 pm, F, 3340 MSRB3, office hours; [email protected] Nathan Raynard; 3-5 pm, Th, 3340 MSRB3, office hours; [email protected] If you have questions, please come to our office hours, talk with us at lecture, or email us.
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Lecture Goals 1. (Lecture #6) What is the working draft of the human genome and its creation? (Lecture # 6) Application – Bird Flu: the next epidemic? 4. What are single nucleotide polymorphisms? How can identifying them be useful? 5. What is recombinant DNA? 6. What does the future hold for uses of genomic information? A draft of the human genome was published in 2000 and a complete sequence in 2003. Genome databases are now published for numerous organisms, from human to bacteria. The genome projects are of extraordinary value to science and society. The projects contribute to understanding human health, how to diagnose, prevent, and treat disease, and to understanding our environment. Genome data may identify predisposition to disease such as breast cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and cystic fibrosis. Researchers examine gene structure, function & evolution in model organisms compared to humans. These findings may lead to new diagnostic tests and therapies. The Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP) may identify data to track disease and human development. A goal of HGDP is to create new strategies for managing vulnerability to disease.
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Application Bird Flu: the next epidemic? Flu is caused by the influenza virus of which there are 3 major types; A, B, and C, with many subtypes. Birds, unlike other animals, are susceptible to all known subtypes of influenza A virus. Typically, humans are not infected with avian influenza A because there are substantial genetic differences between the subtypes which infect humans and birds.
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