Women_as_Reformers[1]

Women_as_Reformers[1] - Women as Reformers The World is the...

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Women as Reformers Women as Reformers “The World is the Home at Large”
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Women as Reformers Women as Reformers I. Origins of Benevolence and Reform A. Revolutionary Republicanism 1776-1787 Right of Revolution B. The Market Revolution, 1790-1830 Poverty and the City C. The New Middle Class and Separate Spheres Tappan Brothers D. The Second Great Awakening, 1810-1855 The Beechers Charles G. Finney F. Women’s Associations
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Women as Reformers: Women as Reformers: Market Revolution and the New Middle: The Feminization of Culture and Markets A. Technology and mass production B. Gendered markets and gendered cultures C. Publishing: Godey’s Lady’s Book and the domestic novel D. Domestic Economy E. Fashion and gender identity
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Women as Reformers: Women as Reformers: II. Education, “female improvement,” and Teaching “Promoting women’s sphere by leaving it.” 1790-1820 New England and the common schools Female Academies 1792 Sarah Pierce. Litchfield Academy, 1814 Emma Willard, Middlebury Female Seminary 1820-1860 Female Seminaries and Teaching 1821 Emma Willard, Troy, 1823 Catherine Beecher, Hartford Seminary 1837 Mary Lyon, Mount Holyoke
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Women as Reformers: Women as Reformers: III. Women’s Activism and the Critique of American Liberalism A. Conservative Reform 1820- Goal: True Womanhood: Piety, Purity, Domesticity, Motherhood Virtue, Order, Discipline, Duty Means: Voluntary Association—Social Control Visiting Institution building
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Women as Reformers Women as Reformers “We look to you, ladies, to raise the standard of character in our own sex” 1. Piety: Gendered property Second Great Awakening: Feminization of Religion: Women’s moral superiority and moral authority Christian nurture v. original sin Associations: Bible and Tract Societies Temperance Crusade
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Women as Reformers: Women as Reformers: A. Conservative Reform 2. Purity: Moral Reform and the Purity Crusade a. Voluntary Motherhood and Passionless Purity and Women’s Sexual control Number of children 1800 7. 04 1850 5.42 1900 3.56 b. End Prostitution : Punish seduces/reform American Female Moral Reform Society 1940 c. Moral children
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Conservative Reform: Temperance Conservative Reform: Temperance The height of women’s religiously motivated social activism in the mid- nineteenth century. Largest reform movement of the 1840s and 1850s. Propaganda: Drunkenness an exclusively male vice, female victims— suffering wives and children temperance promised: self control protects family from hard times. Daughters of Temperance societies : Challenge the morality
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Women_as_Reformers[1] - Women as Reformers The World is the...

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