UW Research Paper

UW Research Paper - The Loved One by Evelyn Waugh brings up the side-effect that death has on the living that once death has taken a loved one the

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The Loved One by Evelyn Waugh brings up the side-effect that death has on the living; that, once death has taken a loved one, the one most affected searches for attachment in others. Prior to the privatization of death in the early 1900s, attachment to the dead can be seen in photographs that were frequently taken with the corpses in order to preserve their memory for the loved ones that would stay behind in life. However, when this changed, photographing the dead soon became socially unacceptable and privatization of death became the social standard. Once this method of coping had been phased out, bereavement of the affected people became much more apparent and the negativity of attachment soon became known. Similar to the real experience of bereavement, Dennis Barlow begins to search- and eventually finds- a person similar to attach himself to in The Loved One . Barlow also serves to shed light on the relationship between the bereaved and the dead; he does not show any major effects of grief, which may pertain to the relationship (or lack of relationship) that he and Sir Francis Hinsley had. Prompted by Barlow’s experience of grief and his attachment to Aimée Thanatogenos, this paper seeks to determine the effect that attachment to the dead has on the bereaved; the different methods of coping, including attachment (or lack of attachment) to other living beings and how the relationship with the dead effects grief. Before examining how attachment affects grief, the different stages of grief must be examined. According to Bill Flatt in “Some Stages of Grief,” there are ten stages of grief: shock, lamentation, withdrawal, frustration, panic, depression, detachment, adaptation, reinvesting, and growth. These mental and physical states do not always follow a completely linear progression; panic may appear during shock, during depression, etc. However, depression must lead to detachment, adaptation, reinvesting, and growth. The intensity of the feelings may also be increased (or decreased), pending on the spontaneous nature of the death. If death is unexpected and unwarranted, the
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course UW 1020-31 taught by Professor Pamelapresser during the Fall '11 term at GWU.

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UW Research Paper - The Loved One by Evelyn Waugh brings up the side-effect that death has on the living that once death has taken a loved one the

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