Progressive_Era_Women_'s_Rights[1]

Progressive_Era_Wome - Women's Rights and the Suffrage Movement 1860-1920 Seneca Falls Objectives Right to equal education Right to own property

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Women’s Rights and the Suffrage Movement: 1860-1920
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Seneca Falls Objectives Right to equal education Right to own property Right to equal economic opportunities The right to vote.
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Seneca Falls Objectives The right to vote. Also right to serve of juries, etc. Attained with the 19th Amendment -- effective in 1920. Took 70 years of efforts by women.
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Women’s Efforts for the Vote Women’s Efforts for the Vote 1848-60: Yearly women’s conventions. Created network of committed women activists. Kept women informed and encouraged.
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Women’s Efforts for the Vote Women’s Efforts for the Vote An Independent Woman’s Suffrage Movement 1865-1890 1866 American Equal Rights Association Elisabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, Julia Ward Howe, William L. Garrison Sojourner Truth Split in movement
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Women’s Efforts for the Vote1860-1890 Women’s Efforts for the Vote1860-1890 During Civil War and after, issue of Black voting divided women: Universal Franchise Association 1868 Mary Ann Shadd Cary National Woman Suffrage Association . 1869 Opposed 15th amendment. Elizabeth Cady Stanton Susan B. Anthony Revolution American Woman Suffrage Association 1869 Supported “half a loaf.” Lucy Stone, Woman’s Journal Argued for a focus on states.
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Woman’s Suffrage American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA) Organized in 1869 by Lucy Stone and her husband Henry Blackwell to reconcile woman suffrage advocacy with the Radical Republican agenda by endorsing the Fifteenth Amendment. They focused on campaigns for suffrage at the state level and, in 1870, started The Woman’s Journal , a weekly newspaper that was continually published for the following fifty years.
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Woman’s Suffrage National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) —Breakaway faction of the AWSA formed by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This group disagreed with former Radical Republican allies over the Fifteenth Amendment, and pursued a more aggressive and independent path. Their organization’s newspaper, The Revolution , proclaimed “Women their rights and nothing less; men their rights and nothing more.” NWSA gained political autonomy for the suffrage movement, but downplayed the interrelated hierarchies of race and gender.
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Discussion: Discussion: Should women have supported black voting when women were not also given the vote?
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Fifteenth Amendment [Proposed 1869; Ratified 1870] Section. 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. Section. 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
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Women’s Rights Movement: The Radicals Sojourner Truth: Black Feminism Elizabeth Cady Stanton Revolution Abortion, prostitution, divorce, prison, domestic violence, labor, marriage, suffrage
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Woman’s Suffrage Victoria Woodhull —Born into poverty, joined the highest
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course HIST 205 taught by Professor Peterson during the Fall '08 term at Wisc Eau Claire.

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Progressive_Era_Wome - Women's Rights and the Suffrage Movement 1860-1920 Seneca Falls Objectives Right to equal education Right to own property

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