lecture_1_F11 - Physics 433 - Lecture 1 Information on web...

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September 29, 2011 Henry Lubatti Physics 433 - Lecture 1 Information on web url is http://silicon.phys.washington.edu/lubatti This page contains general information, lecture notes and experiments Laboratories meet on Thursday and Friday from 1:30 to 4:30 PM. To arrange lab make-up days contact Henry Lubatti and TA: Th lab Rachel Rosten (rcyooper@uw.edu); The first two labs provide the opportunity for you to become acquainted with lab equipment you will use this quarter Transmission lines – coaxial cables Analogue oscilloscopes NIM logic units In this courses the basic detectors and techniques used in modern Particle Physics experiments 1
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Basic physics of all particle detectors All of the techniques employed in detectors have as a basis electro-magnetic interactions Charged particles interact with the electrons bound to atoms and ionize the atom giving free electrons Neutral particles such as neutrons interact with material (strong interactions) with the result that a number of charged particles are liberated that ionize detector material Neutral particle like photons undergo electromagnetic interactions in the electric field of the nucleus and give a electrons and positrons that in turn interact in nuclear matter ionizing atoms. Various devices have been designed to collect the liberated charge along the trajectory of the particle and we will use and in some cases construct some of these devices in the laboratory September 29, 2011 Henry Lubatti 2
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Colinder Detectors The outgoing composite particles interact with the matter of the detector, leave tracks, and deposit their energies. From the tracks and the energy deposits, we can reconstruct what happened during the collision. Energy & Momentum conservation September 29, 2011 Henry Lubatti 3
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A typical modern detector Hadronic layers Tracking system Magnetized volume Calorimeter Induces shower in dense material Innermost tracking layers use silicon Muon detector Interaction point Absorber material Bend angle momentum Electron Experimental signature of a quark or gluon Muon Jet “Missing transverse energy” Signature of a non-interacting (or weakly interacting) particle like a neutrino (based on energy/momentum conservation) EM layers fine sampling September 29, 2011 Henry Lubatti 4
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Large Hadron Collider Detectors ATLAS CMS ATLAS Subsystems Inner Trackers Calorimeters Muon Spectrometer 6.920 m 5.635 m 4.645 m 3.850 m 2.950 m 2.864 m 1.840 m 1.320 Y X ϕ Towards Center of LHC Transverse View μ BIG… Bldg. 40 (5 stories) September 29, 2011 Henry Lubatti 5
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LHC Detectors are Large 24m 44 m The five story LHC Office Building About six stories high and about half of a football field long CMS ATLAS September 29, 2011 Henry Lubatti 6
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The ATLAS Detector 22 m 44 m AT oroidal L HC A pparatu s Inner Detector (ID) S i pixel and strip detector Transition Radiation Tracker: e/ π separation Solenoid magnet of 2T
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lecture_1_F11 - Physics 433 - Lecture 1 Information on web...

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