{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

CERN - Large Hadron Collider - Particle Physics - A Giant Takes On Physics' Biggest Questions2 - NYT

CERN - Large Hadron Collider - Particle Physics - A Giant Takes On Physics' Biggest Questions2 - NYT

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Advertise on NYTimes.com Search All NYTimes.com Science WORLD U.S. N.Y. / REGION BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY SCIENCE HEALTH SPORTS OPINION ARTS STYLE TRAVEL JOBS REAL ESTATE AUTOS ENVIRONMENT SPACE & COSMOS Multimedia Cameras for Capturing Primordial Fire The Large Hadron Collider Related A Bang, a Cloud, a Delay (May 15, 2007) Plucking at Strings (May 15, 2007) Times Topics: Cern RSS Feed Get Science News From The New York Times » A Giant Takes On Physics’ Biggest Questions Published: May 15, 2007 Correction Appended (Page 2 of 6) The prospect of discovery, Dr. Virdee said, is what sustained him and his colleagues over the 16 years it took to develop their machine. Without such detectors, he said, “this field which began with Newton just stops.” “When we started, we did not know how to do this experiment and did not know if it would work,” he said. “Twenty-five hundred scientists can work together. Our judge is not God or governments, but nature. If we make a mistake, nature will not hesitate to punish us.” Game of Cosmic Leapfrog The advent of the Cern collider also cements a shift in the balance of physics power away from American dominance that began in 1993, when Congress canceled the Superconducting Supercollider, a monster machine under construction in Waxahachie, Tex. The supercollider, the most powerful ever envisioned, would have sped protons around a 54-mile racetrack before slamming them together with 40 trillion electron volts. For decades before that, physicists in the United States and Europe had leapfrogged one another with bigger, more expensive and, inevitably, fewer of these machines, which get their magic from Einstein’s equation of mass and energy. The more energy that these machines can pack into their little fireballs, the farther back in time they can go, closer and closer to the Big Bang, the smaller and smaller things they can see.Recalling those times, Dr. Evans said: “There was a nice equilibrium across the Atlantic. People used to come and go.” Now, Dr. Evans said, “The center of gravity has moved to Cern.” The most powerful accelerator now operating is the trillion-electron volt Tevatron, colliding protons and their antimatter opposites, antiprotons, at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Ill. But it is scheduled to shut down by 2010, Go to Complete List » More Articles in Science »
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern