MIT2_00AJs09_res02

MIT2_00AJs09_res02 - MIT OpenCourseWare http:/ocw.mit.edu...

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MIT OpenCourseWare http://ocw.mit.edu 2.00AJ / 16.00AJ Exploring Sea, Space, & Earth: Fundamentals of Engineering Design Spring 2009 For information about citing these materials or our Terms of Use, visit: http://ocw.mit.edu/terms .
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1 Electronics Assembly Kate Thompson Electronic devices for the purpose of this document are components or collections of components that require and/or modify electricity to perform their function. Motors and solenoids turn electric power into mechanical motion. Electronic components like resistors, capacitors and inductors modify the voltage or the current of electricity as it passes through them to enable sensors, control systems and other devices to function. But in order to combines components into devices and devices into more complex systems (like robots), the components and devices must share both a mechanical connection and an electrical connection. The mechanical connection is necessary to keep components in place and in contact. This connection should be strong and prevent the device or system from damage in case of accidental bumping, shaking, tipping, or dropping. The electrical connection is necessary to produce a path of very low resistance, so the electricity may pass through all of the components unimpeded and with tolerable losses. It is sometimes possible to create the mechanical and electrical connection using the same mechanism, but the mechanical strength of the bond is often very low in these cases and the devices could be very fragile. Whenever possible, use a separate method to create the two connections to increase strength and robustness of the design. There are a number of methods that have been developed to allow the assembly of electronic components including soldering, crimping, and off-the-shelf electrical quick connect devices. 1.1 Wire Although many electronic components are designed to allow them to interface directly with other components, many still require wire to carry the electricity between devices. 1.1.1 Wire Electrical wire is just flexible thread or slender rod made from a metal or metal alloy with very low electrical resistivity (usually copper). © Copyright MKThompson 2006 DRAFT DOCUMENTATION
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2 1.1.1.1 Stranded Vs. Solid Core Wire made up of many strands of thread twisted around each other is called "stranded" wire, whereas wire made up of a solid rod of metal is referred to as "solid core" wire. For most applications, it doesn't matter which type of wire you choose. Stranded wire is more flexible and much more resistant to fatigue than solid core but the ends tend to fray if not taped or soldered together. Stranded wire should be used whenever the wire will be moved around a lot and especially when the components will be subjected to vibration or cyclical loading. Solid core will have a slightly lower resistivity over long distances and does not fray so it can be more convenient to use for bread board work but can be more expensive than stranded wire.
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This note was uploaded on 01/28/2012 for the course AERO 2.0 taught by Professor Alexandratechet during the Spring '09 term at MIT.

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MIT2_00AJs09_res02 - MIT OpenCourseWare http:/ocw.mit.edu...

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