Understanding, Interpreting Polls

Understanding, Interpreting Polls - Understanding and...

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Understanding and Interpreting Polls
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Why are polls useful? Poll data can help: Eliminate personal bias and speculation Identify changes in public opinions Cut through competing claims Correct common perception and generalization They help you write with accuracy and avoid relying on personal beliefs, pundits’ remarks or others’ misleading claims.
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Questions you should ask: Who paid for the poll and why was it done? Who did the poll? How was the poll conducted? How many people were interviewed and what’s the margin of sampling error? How were those people chosen? What was the population being represented? When were the interviews conducted? What order were the questions asked in? Are the results based on the answers of all people interviewed, or only a subset? Were the data weighted?
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Academic institutions, federal/state/local governments, media organizations Usually have explicitly stated positions of undertaking
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Understanding, Interpreting Polls - Understanding and...

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