Cognitive Dissonance-1

Cognitive Dissonance-1 - Presented by Rowie Kirby-Straker,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Presented by Rowie Kirby-Straker, COMM 250, University of Maryland © 2011
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Objectives: Cognitive Dissonance Theory (CDT) Goal (purpose) of CDT CDT assumptions CDT’s concepts and explanations Research generated from CDT (incl. tests of CDT) How CDT defines communication What are CDT’s metatheoretical assumptions? Evaluating CDT
Background image of page 2
Historical Background Leon Festinger (1957) Social psychologist A theory of cognitive dissonance ( Stanford University Press, 1957) Leon Festinger & James M. Carlsmith (1959) Cognitive consequences of forced compliance. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology , 58 , 203- 210. $1/$20 study Leon Festinger 1919 - 1989 Wikipedia
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Consistency Theories Cognitive dissonance comes under a category of theories called consistency theories According to this these theories “Mind is a mediator between stimulus and response”
Background image of page 4
Consistency Theories “People organize information into a pattern with previously encountered stimuli” When information (stimulus) is consistent with the pattern we feel consonant, but when it doesn’t fit, we feel discomfort/dissonance The discomfort arises from the discrepancy between current and past stimuli, e.g., between beliefs/values (past) and current
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Goal of CDT Explain: explain attitude change when people experience psychological inconsistency “…to explain communication oriented toward acquiring or supporting one’s cognitions” ( Festinger, 1957 ) Predict attitude change Control (attitude and behavior change)
Background image of page 6
Dissonance Cognitive dissonance – a “feeling of discomfort
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/28/2012 for the course COMM 250 taught by Professor Gaines during the Fall '08 term at Maryland.

Page1 / 25

Cognitive Dissonance-1 - Presented by Rowie Kirby-Straker,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online