S4_mud - Lecture S4 Muddiest Points General Comments In...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture S4 Muddiest Points General Comments In today’s lecture, we finished talking about the node method. From the muddy cards, it’s clear that the lecture cleared up much of the confusion about the node method, which is good. At the end of the lecture, I gave a little Concept Test (due to Eric Mazur at Harvard), asking how the brightness of two bulbs in a circuit changes when a switch is thrown, adding a new battery to the circuit. The surprising answer is that nothing happens! There were a lot of cards on this topic. Rather than answer those cards, I’m going to do three things: (1) Post the Concept Test and solution on the web; (2) talk about the CT in recitation Tuesday; and (3) Do another CT in class on Wednesday. If there are still muddies, please ask again at that point! Responses to Muddiest-Part-of-the-Lecture Cards (54 cards) 1. General confusion about the light bulb concept test. (19 students) See the general comments above. 2. What exactly is a node? (3) A node (or junction) is the point where two or more circuit elements meet. Physically, a node can be spread out — it’s really all the points that are known to be at the same potential, because they are connected. So if two resistors have leads soldered together, and also soldered to a wire that is connected to one terminal of a battery, the battery terminal, wire, and resistor leads all form a single node....
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This note was uploaded on 01/28/2012 for the course AERO 16.01 taught by Professor Markdrela during the Fall '05 term at MIT.

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S4_mud - Lecture S4 Muddiest Points General Comments In...

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