S6_mud - Lecture S6 Muddiest Points General Comments In...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture S6 Muddiest Points General Comments In todays lecture, I finished up the loop method. based on the mud cards, there was not a lot of confusion about this approach. I then started on Thevenin equivalent circuits. I really only got started with that topic. Not surprisingly, there were quite a few questions about this material. We will pick this up again in Lecture S7. Responses to Muddiest-Part-of-the-Lecture Cards (40 cards) 1. Please explain the difference between linear and nonlinear. (6 students) A circuit element is linear if the relationship between voltage and current for the element (the constitutive law) is linear. For static elements (i.e, for elements not described by differential equations) with only two terminals, that means the current can be plotted as a straight line vs. voltage, or that voltage can be plotted as a straight line against current. By this definition, resistors, voltage sources, and current sources are linear. Other circuit elements, such as diodes, fuses, etc., are explicitly nonlinear. For example, a diode is nonlinear because the constitutive law is v = 0 , i > 0 (6) i = 0 , v < 0 2. Do you mean to say that all analog circuits are linear? (1) No, I said (and meant) that all digital circuits are nonlinear. There are certainly nonlinear analog circuits. For example, there are analog circuits that can multiply two signals together. This is a example, there are analog circuits that can multiply two signals together....
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S6_mud - Lecture S6 Muddiest Points General Comments In...

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