Lecture 26 - Replacing the mirror was unthinkable. The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Recap of last lecture . When light has a wavelength l much smaller than objects that it interacts with, we can treat light as composed of straight-line rays. This regime is called geometric optics.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Reflections from a spherical mirrors Mnemonic: Looking at a concave mirror is like looking into a “cave”, the light has to enter a surrounding region. A convex mirror is then the “other” kind of mirror. a + b = 2 f tan a = h/(s- d) tan b = h/(s’ - d) tan f = h/(R- d) Paraxial approximation when a is small we can neglect d and we get 1/s +1/s’ = 2/R = 1/f
Background image of page 2
The focal point and focal length of a spherical mirror
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Hubble Space Telescope The HST has a spherical mirror. Unfortunately, it was ground to the wrong dimensions by 1/50 the width of a human hair over a mirror as large as a person.
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Replacing the mirror was unthinkable. The final solution was an electronic adjustment to the photodiode array which converts the optical image to digital data. figure shows the dramatic before and after images. A concave mirror with a radius of curvature of 20 cm has a focal length of A. 40 cm B. 20 cm C. 10 cm D. 5 cm E. Answer depends on the refractive index of the medium surrounding the mirror Because F = R/2 A system of rays may be constructed to reveal the image The convex spherical mirror Which of the following changes its focal length when it is immersed in water? A. A concave mirror B. A convex mirror C. Both of these D. None of these Because reflection does not have anything to do with the refractive index of the medium....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 01/27/2012 for the course PH 2233 taught by Professor Dipinkardutta during the Spring '11 term at Mississippi State.

Page1 / 9

Lecture 26 - Replacing the mirror was unthinkable. The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online