Lecture 27 - Recap of last lecture Spherical reflecting...

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Recap of last lecture Spherical reflecting surfaces can be concave or convex. (concave is when the mirror is silvered on the outer surface while convex is the other kind.) Under the paraxial approximation (small angles or light almost parallel to the optical axis) 1/s + 1/s’ = 2/R = 1/f ( where s is the object distance s’ is the image distance and R is the radius of curvature and f is the focal length. And magnification is given by y’/y = - s’/s (where y’ is the image size and y is the object size). The location of the image can be found geometrically. Using the following principles 1. A ray passing through the center of curvature (center of the sphere) will reflect back along it’s original direction 2. A ray parallel to the optical axis will pass through the focus 3. A ray through the focus will reflect back to be parallel to the optical axis.
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Recap of last lecture Concave mirror have a real focus (in front of the mirror) Convex mirrors have a virtual focus (behind the mirror) Concave mirrors form real images( inverted, in front of the mirror) except when the object is in between the mirror and its focus.
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2012 for the course PH 2233 taught by Professor Dipinkardutta during the Spring '11 term at Mississippi State.

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Lecture 27 - Recap of last lecture Spherical reflecting...

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