03_igneous_rocks_10-post

03_igneous_rocks_10-post - 03: Earth Materials-Igneous...

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ture 3: 1 03: Earth Materials--Igneous Rocks Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Photo: USGS Hand sample Photomicrograph
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ture 3: 2 Why is this topic important? Igneous rocks reveal hints about the composition and pressure- temperature conditions of rocks that were melted to form igneous rock.
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ture 3: 3 Why is this topic important? Igneous rocks are associated with volcanism, which is a significant geologic hazard 1991 Eruption of Mt. Unzen, Japan. 1973, Eldfell volcano, Heimaey, Iceland
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ture 3: 4 Magma : molten rock derived from melting of the mantle or crust Magma -- less dense than surrounding rocks; rises Some makes its way to surface ( extrusive realm ); some remains below ground ( intrusive realm ) Fig. 6.2 Fig. 6.2
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ture 3: 5 Lava : liquid material at surface Fig. 6.2 Fig. 6.2 Pluton (igneous intrusion) : magma that has intruded other rocks Ash : fine particles exploded at of volcano
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ture 3: 6 Plutons Fig. 6.12 Fig. 6.12 At time 1: Magma (red) intrudes older intrusions (gray) and sedimentary layers (brown); some magma reaches Earth’s surface to form volcanoes and lava flows At time 2: Following cooling and erosion
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ture 3: 7 Types of plutons Dike : tabular pluton that cuts across layering in intruded rock Fig. 6.10 Fig. 6.10
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ture 3: 8 Types of plutons Sill : tabular pluton that is parallel to layering in intruded rock Fig. 6.10 Fig. 6.10
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ture 3: 9 Plutons Fig. 6.12 Fig. 6.12 Batholith Batholith : the largest plutons
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ture 3: 10 Types of plutons Batholith : the largest plutons Sierra Nevada batholith, Yosemite National Park, California. Photo: R.W. Schlische Batholit Batholit h At time 3: Following more erosion Batholit Batholit h
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ture 3: 11 Intrusions: iClicker Q1. For the diagram below, layering in the country rock is shown by the thin lines. The correct names for the plutons are: A. pluton C is a dike and pluton D is a sill. B. pluton C is a sill and pluton D is a dike C. both plutons are sills D. both plutons are dikes
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ture 3: 12 Intrusions: iClicker Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Photo: T. Bean Q2. This intrusion (gray) is a ___. A. batholith B. dike C. sill
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ture 3: 13 Intrusions: iClicker Cliff in Antarctica. Photo: S. Marshak Q3. Layering is highlighted by the green arrows. The intrusion (gray rock between red arrows) is a ____. A. batholith B. dike C. sill
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ture 3: 14 Cooling of igneous rocks Fig. 6.16 Fig. 6.16 Cooling time depends on depth and thickness / size of magma / lava
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ture 3: 15 Cooling of igneous rocks Geotherm : plot of how temperature increases with depth.
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Cooling Rate Refer to the diagram below. For each set of locations, indicate which one would experience the slower cooling rate. Q3. A. g
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03_igneous_rocks_10-post - 03: Earth Materials-Igneous...

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