S14_mud - Lecture S14 Muddiest Points General Comments We...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture S14 Muddiest Points General Comments We wrapped up the last Signals and Signals lectures by talking about transfer functions, which describe the ratio of the output amplitude to the input amplitude, for sinusoidal inputs. We saw that we can compute the transfer function from the state-space description, or by using impedance methods. Of course, the two approaches give the same results. We applied these results to a bandpass filter, and showed how a bandpass filter can selectively filter out all frequencies except for those in a narrow band of frequencies. And, of course, we had doughnuts. Responses to Muddiest-Part-of-the-Lecture Cards (41 cards) 1. If the transfer function is G ( s ) = C ( sI A ) 1 B + D (38) and ( sI A ) 1 is a matrix, how is it that G ( s ) is just a scalar function? (2 students) If A is n n , B is n 1, C is 1 n , then the product C ( sI A ) 1 B is a scalar. 2. How did you find v 1 y ( t ) = 1 0 + 0 u ( t ) ? (39) i 2 (3) Because the output terminals connect to the same nodes as the capacitor, y ( t ) = v 1 (40) This is the same as...
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This note was uploaded on 01/28/2012 for the course AERO 16.01 taught by Professor Markdrela during the Fall '05 term at MIT.

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S14_mud - Lecture S14 Muddiest Points General Comments We...

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