sp_S5_mud

sp_S5_mud - Lecture S5 Muddiest Points General Comments...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture S5 Muddiest Points General Comments Welcome back from Spring Break! Today, we did graphical convolution of signals. This material is really important, both because we will build on this material, but also because it’s useful for increasing your intuition about signals in general. Responses to Muddiest-Part-of-the-Lecture Cards (20 cards) 1. How do you design a “matched filter”? (1 student) Generally, a matched filter has an impulse response that is equal to the time-reversed signal we are trying to detect. This is not always possible to do exactly, but can often be well-approximated. The flip-and-slide method helps explain why the time-reversed signal is the right matched filter to use. 2. So then you jam radar by flooding it with signals it sends out? (1) That’s one way, although that approach can be defeated by sending out a random signals. (This is one way GPS prevents jamming or spoofing.) You can also overwhelm a radar by sending out lots of power in the frequency range of the radar, whether or not the signal shape is the same....
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This note was uploaded on 01/28/2012 for the course AERO 16.01 taught by Professor Markdrela during the Fall '05 term at MIT.

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sp_S5_mud - Lecture S5 Muddiest Points General Comments...

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