sp_S14_mud

sp_S14_mud - Lecture S14 Muddiest Points General Comments...

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Lecture S14 Muddiest Points General Comments In today’s lecture, we looked at the problem of Fnding the inverse LT for bilateral Laplace transforms. Although noncausal systems are rare, they do occur, so the bilateral LT is important. Responses to Muddiest-Part-of-the-Lecture Cards (11 cards) 1. In the concept question, you got the y ( t ) graph that looks like [1st graph]. Why isn’t the graph symmetric about the y axis, so it looks like [2nd graph]? (1 student) g ( t ) is symmetric about t = 0, but u ( t ) isn’t. As a result, y ( t ) isn’t symmetric. 2. If G ( s ) has three terms, how do we know the region of convergence? (1) The r.o.c. depends on information other than the number of terms in the partial fraction expansion of G ( s ). ±or example, if we know that the signal g ( t ) is causal, then we know that the r.o.c. is to the right of the rightmost pole. If we know g ( t ) is stable, then the r.o.c. includes the imaginary axis. There are other ways to determine the r.o.c., depending on the problem. 3.
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sp_S14_mud - Lecture S14 Muddiest Points General Comments...

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