sp4_fall_2003

sp4_fall_2003 - Massachusetts Institute of Technology...

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics Cambridge, MA 02139 16.01/16.02 Unified Engineering I, II Fall 2003 Systems Problem 4 Name: Due Date: Parts 1, 2, 3 - 10/2/2003 Parts 4, 5, 6, 7 - 10/9/2003 Time Spent (min) Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 Part 6 Part 7 Study Time Announcements: Please turn in this cover sheet on 10/9/2003
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MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics 16.010 / 16.020 Unified Engineering Systems Problems #4 Issued: September 25, 2003 Part 1, 2, and 3 Due: 5:00p October 2, 2003 Parts 4, 5, 6, and 7 Due: 5:00p October 9 2003 WATER BOTTLE ROCKET PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS Objectives After completing this systems problem, you should be able to: • Apply rocket performance equations and thermodynamics such that you can call yourself a Novice Rocket Scientist. • Apply concepts from freshman year (especially 8.01) and from Unified to model a system of modest complexity. • Use simple computational tools such as a spreadsheet to compute the performance of a system based on an engineering model. • Explain an engineering model, its underlying concepts, its assumptions, and its limitations. • Use an engineering model for parameter design to improve performance. Discussion This is the first of three consecutive systems problems devoted to the design of a small rocket propelled by compressed air and water. In this systems problem, you will estimate rocket performance and make a preliminary analysis of the impact of two design parameters on the maximum altitude achieved by the rocket. This includes developing a computer spreadsheet to aid in the analysis. The second systems problem (next week) will focus on your design of a new, higher-performance rocket, while the third systems problem will involve construction of your rocket, flight testing, and final performance analysis. 1 of 8
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We will begin with a baseline rocket system that uses a standard 2 liter soda bottle for the rocket structure and fuel storage. The bottle will be partially filled with water and mounted on a rocket launch mechanism (Figure 1). The air in the bottle will then be pressurized, and the launch will be executed. We will focus on this baseline rocket in this systems problem and predict its performance. In the following systems problem, you will design your own rocket and will perform a performance analysis of your design. So, your work here lays the groundwork for the next several weeks. Water Launch Rod Release pin Two-liter soda bottle Air at 60 psig 7 in Figure 1. Water Bottle Rocket and Launching Mechanism 2 of 8
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The same launching mechanism will be used for the baseline rocket we examine here and for the rocket you design later. The mechanism uses a 7-inch-long rod to provide stability and to ensure that the rocket proceeds in a straight line. The bottle is inverted onto the rod, and the launcher is staked to the ground. A metal launch restraining pin is inserted over the lip of the bottle neck to
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This note was uploaded on 01/28/2012 for the course AERO 16.01 taught by Professor Markdrela during the Fall '05 term at MIT.

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sp4_fall_2003 - Massachusetts Institute of Technology...

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