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styleguideuerev2 - Style Guide for 16.62X Experimental...

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Unformatted text preview: Style Guide for 16.62X Experimental Projects Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics Spring 2003 Daniel R. Craig Jennifer C. Pixley This document offers guidelines for writing, formatting, and citing sources for deliverables required in 16.62X experimental projects lab. Students in other courses may use it as their professors direct. It covers key points. Executive Summary (Required in the 16.621 design proposal) The executive summary contains the key points of a document. It is written for a non-expert reader(s) and thus uses more general language than found in the main body of the document. It should be double-spaced on a separate page that usually precedes the table of contents. An executive summary is generally no more than one page long although longer proposals or reports may require longer executive summaries. 2 An executive summary is a very compressed version of the entire proposal or report. It could be read in place of the proposal or report by a general reader who wanted to understand the project but didn’t have time to read the detailed version. Thus, an executive summary covers the significance of the work; summarizes the background and previous work in this area; describes the immediate project; may sketch out the experimental design; may summarize methods and materials; and ends with conclusions and discussions. <or> Informative Abstract (Required in the 16.622 final report) An informative abstract is single-spaced and 100-250 words. It includes the following information: project, method, results, and conclusions. It does NOT include citations, acronyms, equations, abbreviations, background or discussions of future research. It stands alone; a reader should be able to grasp the key results of the entire project from reading the abstract. Abstracts are written for an expert audience; thus they use more technical language. Abstracts are placed at the beginning of a document. Sometimes they precede the table of contents; at other times, they are placed just before the main text. 3 Table of Contents 1.0 DOCUMENT STRUCTURE............................................................................... 6 1.1 C OVER S HEET ...................................................................................................... 6 1.2 S ECTIONS AND S UBSECTIONS ............................................................................... 6 1.3 P AGE N UMBERS ................................................................................................... 7 1.4 T ABLE OF C ONTENTS ; L IST OF TABLES AND FIGURES ........................................... 7 1.5 S PACING AND F ONTS ............................................................................................ 7 1.6 A CRONYMS .......................................................................................................... 7 1.7 T ABLES AND F IGURES .......................................................................................... 8 ....
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styleguideuerev2 - Style Guide for 16.62X Experimental...

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