2010-Casas_et_al - Postweaning growth and carcass traits in...

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E. Casas, R. M. Thallman, L. A. Kuehn and L. V. Cundiff Brangus, Beefmaster, Bonsmara, and Romosinuano maternal grandsires Postweaning growth and carcass traits in crossbred cattle from Hereford, Angus, doi: 10.2527/jas.2009-2271 originally published online Oct 9, 2009; 2010.88:102-108. J Anim Sci http://jas.fass.org/cgi/content/full/88/1/102 the World Wide Web at: The online version of this article, along with updated information and services, is located on www.asas.org by on April 11, 2011. jas.fass.org Downloaded from
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ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to char- acterize breeds representing diverse biological types for postweaning growth and carcass composition traits in terminal crossbred cattle. Postweaning growth and car- cass traits were analyzed on 464 steers and 439 heifers obtained by mating F 1 cows to Charolais and MARC III (1/4 Hereford, 1/4 Angus, 1/4 Pinzgauer, and 1/4 Red Poll) sires. The F 1 cows were obtained from mating Angus and MARC III dams to Hereford, Angus, Beef- master, Brangus, Bonsmara, and Romosinuano sires. Traits evaluated were postweaning ADG, slaughter weight, HCW, dressing percentage, percentage of car- casses classified as USDA Choice, LM area, marbling score, USDA yield grade, fat thickness, retail product yield (percentage), and retail product weight. Mater- nal grandsire breed was significant ( P < 0.05) for all traits. Animals with Angus grandsires grew faster and had the heaviest carcasses, with the greatest percentage of carcasses classified as USDA Choice and the great- est marbling scores when compared with other grand- sire breeds. Animals with Romosinuano and Bonsmara inheritance grew slower, had the lightest weights at slaughter, the lightest carcass weights, the least per- centage of carcasses classified as USDA Choice, and the least amount of marbling and fat thickness. Animals with inheritance from these 2 breeds had a more desir- able yield grade with the greatest retail product yield. Maternal granddam breed was significant ( P < 0.05) for marbling score, USDA yield grade, fat thickness, and retail product yield. Sex class was significant ( P < 0.05) for all traits except for retail product yield. Steers grew faster, were heavier, had heavier carcasses, and were leaner than heifers. Heifers had a greater dressing percentage, a greater percentage of carcasses classified as USDA Choice, a greater LM area, and a decreased yield grade when compared with steers. Sire and grand- sire breed effects can be optimized by selection and use of appropriate crossbreeding systems. Key words: beef cattle, breed, carcass composition, growth ©2010 American Society of Animal Science. All rights reserved. J. Anim. Sci. 2010. 88:102–108 doi:10.2527/jas.2009-2271 INTRODUCTION The Germplasm Evaluation ( GPE ) program at the US Meat Animal Research Center characterizes breeds representing several biological types of cattle. In this program, postweaning growth (Cundiff et al., 1981, 1984), carcass composition, and meat quality traits
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This note was uploaded on 01/26/2012 for the course ECON 2272 taught by Professor Gay during the Spring '08 term at Birmingham-Southern College.

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2010-Casas_et_al - Postweaning growth and carcass traits in...

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