Animal Behavio1 - Animal Behavior Signaling and Communication Tactile Signals Physical contact is limited in its ability to communicate because it

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Animal Behavior: Signaling and Communication Tactile Signals Physical contact is limited in its ability to communicate because it is extremely short-range. Many invertebrates use antennae as the first line of contact with objects and organisms. The honeybee waggle dance used to explain the location of a food source is often performed in a dark hive, and so the foragers receive their information by interpreting the dance with their antennae. The most common use of tactile communication occurs during copulation. Tactile stimulation by males will often let a female know when to adopt a sexually receptive posture, as in rodents. In primates, grooming is an extremely important social activity. It functions to remove parasites, but also to secure social bonds. This is also true of humans, for whom touch is an initimate form of communication. Electrical Signals Sharks and some fish have electroreceptors that are used to detect objects and to socially communicate. Electrolocation is a form of autocommunication; signalers send and receive their
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2012 for the course BIOLOGY BSC1005 taught by Professor Rodriguez during the Winter '09 term at Broward College.

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