DNA Replicatio5 - DNA Replication The Leading and Lagging...

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Unformatted text preview: DNA Replication The Leading and Lagging Strands The Leading Strand Since DNA replication moves along the parent strand in the 5' to 3' direction, replication can occur very easily on the leading strand. As seen in , the nucleotides are added in the 5' to 3' direction. Triggered by RNA primase, which adds the first nucleotide to the nascent chain, the DNA polymerase simply sits near the replication fork, moving as the fork does, adding nucleotides one after the other, preserving the proper anti-parallel orientation. This sort of replication, since it involves one nucleotide being placed right after another in a series, is called continuous. The Lagging Strand Whereas the DNA polymerase on the leading strand can simply follow the replication fork, because DNA polymerase must move in the 5' to 3' direction, on the lagging strand the enzyme must move away from the fork. But if the enzyme moves away from the fork, and the fork is uncovering new DNA that needs to be replicated, then how can the lagging strand be replicated...
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2012 for the course BIOLOGY BSC1005 taught by Professor Rodriguez during the Winter '09 term at Broward College.

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DNA Replicatio5 - DNA Replication The Leading and Lagging...

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