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Introduction to Mitosis - Introduction to Mitosis Telophase...

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Introduction to Mitosis Telophase and Cytokinesis The final two events of M phase are the re-forming of the nuclear envelope around the separated sister chromatids and the cleavage of the cell. These events occur in telophase and cytokinesis, respectively. In this section we will review the events that comprise these final phases of M phase. Telophase Figure %: Telophase Telophase is technically the final stage of mitosis. Its name derives from the latin word telos which means end. During this phase, the sister chromatids reach opposite poles. The small nuclear vesicles in the cell begin to re-form around the group of chromosomes at each end. As the nuclear envelope re-forms by associating with the chromosomes, two nuclei are created in the one cell. Telophase is also marked by the dissolution of the kinetochore microtubules and the continued elongation of the polar microtubules. As the nuclear envelopes re-form, the chromosomes begin to decondense and become more diffuse.
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