Plant Structure4 - Plant Structures Transport The vascular...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Plant Structures Transport The vascular system in the stem is continuous with that of the roots, providing an easy route for water and nutrients to flow throughout the plant body. The organization of vascular tissues is different for various types of plants--from the scattered vascular bundles (containing both xylem and phloem) of monocots to the more orderly ring formation found in dicots. This difference in the organization of the vascular tissues has implications for the way the plant grows. (For a general discussion of monocots and dicots, see Plant Classification, Monocots and Plant Classification, Dicots.) Monocot Stems In monocots, xylem and phloem are organized in vascular bundles scattered throughout the stem. As the plant grows, monocot stems generate new vascular bundles for the new tissue. Monocot stems in general possess a simpler arrangement than that found in dicots; the main elements of the stem are merely the vascular bundles and the pith (used for nutrient storage) that surrounds...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 01/27/2012 for the course BIOLOGY BSC1005 taught by Professor Rodriguez during the Winter '09 term at Broward College.

Page1 / 2

Plant Structure4 - Plant Structures Transport The vascular...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online