Ch 8 Extinction and Stimulus Control

Ch 8 Extinction and Stimulus Control - Ch 8 Extinction and...

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Ch 8 Extinction and Stimulus Control
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Topics Extinction Side effects Resistance to extinction Spontaneous recovery Stimulus Control Some basics Multiple Schedules Memory Some applications
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Extinction the nonreinforcement of a previously reinforced response, the result of which is a decrease in the strength of that response. It refers to both a procedure and a process. The procedure of extinction is the nonnreinforcement of a previously reinforced response. The process of extinction is the resultant decrease in response strength.
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Example a rat has learned to press a lever for food: Lever press Food R SR If lever pressing is no longer followed by food: Lever press No food R then the frequency of lever pressing will decline.
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Example, continued In this example, The act of withholding food delivery following a lever press is the procedure of extinction. The resultant decline in responding is the process of extinction. If lever pressing ceases entirely, the response is said to have been extinguished. If it has not yet ceased entirely, then the response has been only partially extinguished.
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Identify the reinforcer When applying an extinction procedure, be sure that the consequence being withheld is in fact the reinforcer that is maintaining the behavior. Determining the effective reinforcer that is maintaining a behavior is a critical first step in extinguishing a behavior. Example: Whining child
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Side Effects of Extinction When an extinction procedure is implemented, it is often accompanied by certain side effects, including: Extinction Burst - temporary Increase in Variability – try new things Emotional Behavior - frustration Aggression Resurgence – other behaviors previously effective Depression – below original baseline
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Problems with Side Effects Side effects of extinction impede successful implementation of extinction.
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2012 for the course PSY 320 taught by Professor Mae during the Spring '11 term at ASU.

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Ch 8 Extinction and Stimulus Control - Ch 8 Extinction and...

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