xray - Why are X-rays dangerous? X-rays are electromagnetic...

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Unformatted text preview: Why are X-rays dangerous? X-rays are electromagnetic radiation ranging in wavelength from about 100 A to 0.01 A. The shorter the wavelength of the x-ray, the greater its energy and its penetrating power. X-rays are typically used in the field of scientific research, industry, and medicine. They have become a crucial tool in medical imaging because they allow doctors to see inside the body without the use of invasive procedures. Although they can be quite beneficial, they can also be dangerous because as with any other source of radiation, its key component with regards to health risks is exposure. Because of lead aprons that patients wear, there is not too much exposure to radiation at once; however, with the increased number of x-rays performed is an increased exposure to radiation and can therefore lead to potential dangers to a patient's health. It has been said that x-rays should only be performed when absolutely necessary because it can cause an increased exposure to radiation and therefore lead to cancer. Shu et al. (2002) and Grufferman et al. (2009) discovered that in utero and postnatal exposure to x-rays can lead to childhood leukemia...
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This note was uploaded on 01/28/2012 for the course BIOL 1107L taught by Professor T.a. during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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xray - Why are X-rays dangerous? X-rays are electromagnetic...

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