Ch 5_Anxiety Disorders_Student Version

Ch 5_Anxiety Disorders_Student Version - READINGCHECKIN...

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READING CHECK-IN Option #1: Tell me about something interesting or surprising that you learned about an anxiety disorder. Why did you find it interesting/surprising? Option #2 Ask me a question about something you are curious about after reading the chapter. Give me a little background on your question & why you are curious about it.
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ANXIE TY ANXIE TY The Good, The Bad, & The Disordered
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NATURE OF ANXIETY AND FEAR Fear Present-oriented  mood state, marked negative affect Immediate fight or flight response to danger or threat Strong avoidance/escapist tendencies Abrupt activation of the sympathetic nervous system Anxiety Future-oriented  mood state Characterized by marked negative affect Somatic symptoms of tension Apprehension about future danger or misfortune Anxiety and Fear are Normal Emotional States
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ANXIETY COMPONENTS  Somatic Emotional Cognitive Behavioral
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ADAPTIVE VS. MALADAPTIVE  ANXIETY Concerns are realistic  responses Concerns are  proportionate to  threat Ends when threat  reduces Unrealistic response Disproportionate  response  Persistent Severe enough to  lower the quality of  life Chronic and frequent  enough to interfere  with functioning Adaptive Maladaptive Anxiety
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ANXIETY DISORDERS Most common psychiatric disorders Phobias most common Comorbidity is common across the anxiety  disorders About half of patients have > 2 or more  secondary diagnoses Major depression is the most common  secondary diagnosis Can be significantly impairing
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ANXIETY VS. DEPRESSION TRIPARTITE MODEL  Anxiety Depression 
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Anxiety Disorder Types 3 Basic Types: Unfocused anxiety (Panic disorder and Generalized  Anxiety disorder) Focused anxiety (Phobias and Posttraumatic Stress  disorder)  Anxiety requiring response (Obsessive-compulsive  disorder)
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GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER (GAD) Pervasive, excessive anxiety and worry about a number of everyday, routing events of activities, such as finances, health, being late, care repairs, work, etc. Physical & mood symptoms: Interferes in daily life Sx > 6 months before diagnosis 5% Women, 3% Men Restlessness, Feeling on edge Fatigue, Difficulty concentrating,  Irritability Muscle tension and Sleep disturbance
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GAD THEORIES Psychodynamic Theories Neurotic anxiety Moral anxiety Humanistic and Existential Theories Conditions of worth and existential anxiety Cognitive Theory Focused on threat Importance of control & predictability Two major cognitive distortions Probability overestimation- overestimates likelihood of future negative events Catastrophic thinking- viewing an event as horrible, intolerable, or beyond  one’s ability to cope Biological Theories GABA & the limbic system
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