28 - Style Oratory Cicero Plain Middle Vigorous Students of Rhetoric Greek-Medieval 1 Politicians 2 Lawyers Women in Rhetoric Included Symbolically

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Style: Oratory Cicero: Plain Middle Vigorous Students of Rhetoric: Greek-Medieval 1. Politicians 2. Lawyers Women in Rhetoric Included Symbolically but Excluded Substantively 1. No education 2. Biblical Commands for Women’s Silence 3. Prohibitions on speech in public From the Harlot of the Arts to the Salon, Pulpit and Podium A. When and Where Italy, France and England in 1600’s Other Speakers: Christine De Pisan (1364-1430) and Margaret Cavendish (1661-1717)
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B. Conditions of Possibility Born into high social rank Encouraging husbands C. How Appropriate rhetorical theory as tools to advocate for right to education and speech Blur context between private conversation and public speech D. Sources: Plato, Cicero, Augustine E. So What? Redefines the Line Between Public and Private Competing Scholarship 1. Redefines Rhetorical Theory 2. No Woman “known to have written an account of rhetoric” Margaret Feel (1614-1702): Potential for leadership fostered by rise of Quakerism 1.
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course CRS 183 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at Syracuse.

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28 - Style Oratory Cicero Plain Middle Vigorous Students of Rhetoric Greek-Medieval 1 Politicians 2 Lawyers Women in Rhetoric Included Symbolically

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