The Expectancy Violations Theory developed as a model for studying unexpected violations in nonverba

The Expectancy Violations Theory developed as a model for studying unexpected violations in nonverba

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Bobby Krivitsky CRS 181 1. The Expectancy Violations Theory developed as a model for studying unexpected violations in nonverbal communication. We define expectancy as what people predict will happen, rather than what they desire to happen. After the violation, we define their response as positive, neutral, or negatively valenced. In the case of Joel and Lisa, Joel expects that because Lisa knows he is tired, that if he participates in the survey they will have short conversations. Lisa on the other hand, expects Joel to fully interact in the survey so that the two can accurately gage where their marriage is. Joel first violates her expectations when they start talking about the budget and they disagree on how to define a budget. Joel then fails to answer the question, blowing it off. After her expectations have been violated, Lisa begins to drop arguments and move onto the next question.
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course CRS 181 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Syracuse.

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The Expectancy Violations Theory developed as a model for studying unexpected violations in nonverba

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