Lecture 7

Lecture 7 - Depth perception: Ability to see objects in 3-D...

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Depth perception : Ability to see objects in 3-D although the objects that strike the Retina are 2-D I. How? A. Binocular Cues (require both eyes) Eyes are about 2 1/2 inches apart so our Retinas receive slightly different images = Retinal Disparity Example: 3-D movies Two eyes + Brain = Depth A. Monocular Cues (available to each eye) Relative Size : Two objects of similar size, the smaller retinal image is perceived as farther away Interposition : One object blocking the view of another is perceived as closer Relative Clarity : Hazy objects are farther than sharp, clear objects Texture Gradient : Fine indistinct texture is seen as farther than coarse, distinct texture Relative Height : Objects higher in our field of vision are farther away e.g., Vertical lines make you look taller, thinner Relative Motion : As we move, stable objects appear to move relative to us e.g., Fix on a house in a car: Closer objects look like they’re speeding backwards; Linear Perspective :
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course PGS 101 taught by Professor Blan during the Fall '08 term at ASU.

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Lecture 7 - Depth perception: Ability to see objects in 3-D...

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