AOSC200Lect3

AOSC200Lect3 - AOSC Lesson 3 Temperature Scales Temperature...

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AOSC Lesson 3
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Temperature Scales Temperature scales are defined by upper and lower calibration points (fixed points) In the Fahrenheit temperature scale the lower fixed point of 0 °F is defined as the temperature of a mixture of salt and ice. Dr. Fahrenheit was a physician, and he defined the upper fixed point, 100 °F, as the average temperature of his (sick?) patients. In the Centigrade (Celsius) scale, the lower fixed point, 0 °C, is defined as the temperature of the melting point of ice, while the upper fixed point, 100 °C, is defined as the boiling point of water. The Kelvin scale is a scientific scale. Here the lowest fixed point 0 °K is defined as the theoretically lowest temperature that can be reached. On this scale the melting point of ice is about 273°K. One degree K = one degree C.
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Fig. 2-1, p. 29
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Table 2-1, p. 30 Specific Heat
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How is energy transferred in the atmosphere? Tornados, Hurricanes, Severe Storms all require a
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course AOSC 200 taught by Professor Hudson during the Fall '08 term at Maryland.

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AOSC200Lect3 - AOSC Lesson 3 Temperature Scales Temperature...

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