fsw261- studyguide chapters 5-9

fsw261- studyguide chapters 5-9 - Family Studies Chapter 5:...

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Family Studies Chapter 5: Love Love Romantic o Profoundly tender/passionate affection Erotic o Sexual attraction and satisfaction Dependent o Fulfillment of needs Friendship/companionate o Commonality and respect Altruistic o Unselfish concern and caring What is Love? Deep and vital emotion (caring ad acceptance) Book definition : deep and vital emotion resulting from significant need for satisfaction, coupled with a caring for and acceptance of the beloved, and resulting in an intimate relationship Satisfies personal needs o Cannot satisfy ALL needs o Legitimate vs. illegitimate needs (make look worthy of love) Involves caring and acceptance o Gender differences o Accepting someone for who they are and their faults Involves intimacy o Psychic intimacy (build emotional bond) o Sexual intimacy (physical) Commitment o Consciously investing in relationship Triangular Theory of Love Building blocks o Intimacy ( emotional ) Close, connected, bonded feelings o Passion ( physical ) Drive leading to romance, physical attraction, and sex o Commitment ( cognitive ) Decision: short term vs. long term Sternberg’s Triangular Theory Intimacy, passion, commitment I, P, C: consummate love
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Six Love Styles 1. Eros Intense emotion and powerful sexual feelings/desires Similar to Erotic 2. Stoge Deepening mutual commitment, respect, and friendship 3. Pragma Rational assessment of potential partner’s assets and liabilities Relates to social exchange theory 4. Agape Unself concern for loved one 5. Ludis Love as play or fun Love is a game 6. Mania Strong sexual attraction and emotion and extreme jealousy and moodiness Common with violence relationship What Love is NOT! Martyring o Consistently ignoring own needs while trying to satisfy all partner’s needs o Prevents openness and intimacy Manipulating o Controlling feelings, attitudes, and behaviors of another in underhanded ways o Damages relationships ( minimize complaints ) Limerence o Psycho-emotional situation in which one obsesses about another person and years for reciprocation but has little, if any, concern for the other person’s well being Self-Worth: Prerequisite to Loving Self-love NOT narcissism o Self-love enhances capacity to love others Narcissism - preoccupation with oneself without regard for well-being of others Self-worth enhances ability to: o Establish and maintain relationships o Express oneself o Tolerate criticism and be responsive to praise. Also Necessary for Loving Emotional interdependence o Autonomy in context of mutually supportive relationship Three types of relationships o A-frame ” (overly dependent) (needy of relationships) o H-frame ” (overly independent)
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o M-frame ” (emotional interdependence) (own person and deep emotions) When is the Best Time to fall in Love? No best time; different for each
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2012 for the course FSW 261 taught by Professor Newlin during the Spring '08 term at Miami University.

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fsw261- studyguide chapters 5-9 - Family Studies Chapter 5:...

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