Becoming a Bureaucrat

Becoming a Bureaucrat - Becoming a Bureaucrat There are two...

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Becoming a Bureaucrat There are two types of bureaucrats in the federal bureaucracy: political appointees and civil servants. Political Appointees The president can appoint approximately 2,000 people to top positions within the federal bureaucracy. These people are known as political appointees. Choosing Political Appointees The president usually receives nominations and suggestions from party officials, political allies, close advisers, academics, and business leaders on whom to appoint to bureaucratic offices. Sometimes the president appoints loyal political allies to key positions, particularly ambassadorships. This tradition is referred to as the spoils system or simply patronage. Garfield’s Assassination Charles Julius Guiteau, a strong supporter of the spoils system, grew angry when President James Garfield repeatedly denied him a diplomatic posting in Paris. On July 2, 1881, Guiteau shot Garfield, who later died of complications from the wound. Garfield’s assassination prompted Congress to change rules governing the selection of
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Becoming a Bureaucrat - Becoming a Bureaucrat There are two...

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