Elections in the United States use one of two kinds of Australian ballots

Elections in the United States use one of two kinds of Australian ballots

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Elections in the United States use one of two kinds of Australian ballots: 1. The office-block ballot (also called the Massachusetts Ballot): Candidates are grouped by office. 2. The party-column ballot (also called the Indiana Ballot): Candidates are grouped by party. Political parties do not like office block ballots because these ballots encourage people to vote for candidates from different parties (a practice known as split-ticket voting ). Instead, political parties prefer party-column ballots because these ballots make it easy to choose candidates only from a particular party. Some of these ballots even allow voters to choose all of a party’s candidates by checking a single box, or pulling a single lever, a practice called straight-ticket voting. Partisan Battles over Ballots Political parties tend to support whatever ballot helps them get the most votes. In the 1998 election, the Democratic Party in Illinois won big, in part because of a very effective campaign to get voters to vote straight-ticket Democrat. After the election,
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/31/2012 for the course POS POS2112 taught by Professor Leslietaylor during the Winter '09 term at Broward College.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online