Redistricting and Competition

Redistricting and Competition - The Presidency In popular...

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Redistricting and Competition Both parties have become so skilled at drawing district maps for political advantage that most districts are not competitive. In the 2006 elections, for example, election analysts estimated that only twenty to forty seats would be competitive—less than 10 percent of the House. Minority-Majority Districts Following the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, some states began to draw district boundaries to maximize minority representation in Congress. To accomplish this, states created minority-majority districts, districts specifically created to have more than 50 percent minority voters. These districts might combine neighborhoods that are far apart, a process sometimes called racial gerrymandering. The Supreme Court has overturned racial gerrymandering, but because racial gerrymandering is as difficult to prove as ordinary gerrymandering, the process continues.
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Unformatted text preview: The Presidency In popular culture, the president of the United States has been an action hero ( Air Force One, Independence Day ), a romantic leading man ( The American President ), a dastardly villain ( Absolute Power ), a lovable ordinary guy ( Dave ), a buffoon ( Wag the Dog ), and a well-meaning do-gooder ( The West Wing ). Other movies explore the lives of actual presidents, including George Washington, Young Mr. Lincoln, Wilson, JFK, and Nixon. In reality, being president of the United States is one of the most difficult jobs in the world. The president is under constant pressure to please many people, including members of his or her political party and the American people. Every move is examined under a critical microscope, and every gaffe is widely reported. For better or worse, the president becomes the face of the United States for the four-year term spent in office....
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2012 for the course POS POS2112 taught by Professor Leslietaylor during the Winter '09 term at Broward College.

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