The Illusion of Presidential Government

The Illusion of - The Illusion of Presidential Government Presidents wish to convey an image of strength and effectiveness to the public but in

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The Illusion of Presidential Government Presidents wish to convey an image of strength and effectiveness to the public, but in reality, the president’s power is often constrained and limited. In 1981, presidential scholar Hugh Heclo labeled the perception that the president is in charge of the government the “illusion of presidential government.” Portraying strength and confidence can be a successful strategy, but it can also backfire because a president who appears too successful may get blamed later for anything that goes wrong. The President and the Public Theodore Roosevelt changed the public’s perception of the presidency by asserting the centrality of the office in American government. The president is chosen by the whole nation, not just a district or state, and therefore the office of the president is the most important office in the federal government. Roosevelt’s stewardship theory of the presidency claimed that the president has the right to do whatever the nation needs,
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2012 for the course POS POS2112 taught by Professor Leslietaylor during the Winter '09 term at Broward College.

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