Hispanic American Diversity week 7

Hispanic American Diversity week 7 - Hispanic American...

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Hispanic American Diversity Hispanic American Diversity Cultural Diversity Eth 125 University of Phoenix Mark Watson May 9, 2010 Timothy Albert
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There are various differences and similarities through out the different Hispanic immigrants that come to America each and everyday. Discussion in this paper will identify the linguistic, political, social, economical, religious, and family statues of four Hispanic groups living in the U.S. According to Schaefer, “about 23 percent of Mexican Americans are English dominant, 26 percent are bilingual, and 51 percent are Spanish dominant.” Throughout U.S. history, Mexican Americans have been classified as “White” through legal constructions and census criteria. Mexican Americans are becoming a greater voting influence. Mexican Americans created their own independent party called the La Raza Unida, out of frustration regarding established politicians. U.S. born Mexican Americans earn more income and are represented more in the middle-and upper-class, more than recently arriving immigrants. Most of the immigrants from Mexico come from the lower classes and come to America to reside with family members that have lower skilled jobs. The median family income of a Mexican American is roughly $32,345 annually (Therrien and Ramirez 2001) (Schaefer). Mexican Americans remain very family oriented and close to those back home. The United States is very close to Mexico, so the notion of families being reunited is quite possible. Many immigrants leave Mexico and come to American to stay with relatives and pursue better economic opportunities. Families often rely on each other for a combined income in order for other family members to immigrate to America. The Jones Act established that in 1917, all Puerto Ricans, whether born within the U.S. or in Puerto Rico, are citizens of the United States. Puerto Ricans residing in Puerto Rico cannot vote in the U.S. Presidential election, nor are they represented by a voting U.S. Representative or
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Senator (Green). They are represented by a Resident Commissioner in the U.S. House of Representatives who has the right of voice, but not vote. Puerto Ricans residing in the United States, however, do have all rights and privileges associated with residing in a U.S. State. Puerto Ricos economic status is that of extremely poor and largely lower-class. For years the
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2012 for the course AAIT Ethics125/ taught by Professor Pearlman during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Hispanic American Diversity week 7 - Hispanic American...

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