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Chapter 9 Engineers and the Environment

Chapter 9 Engineers and the Environment - CIV 402...

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CIV 402: Engineering Ethics Chapters Summary Chapter 9: Engineers & the Environment Main Ideas in this chapter: Environment law focuses on making the environment “clean.” There are various criteria for “clean.” A “progressive” attitude toward the environment goes beyond what the law requires, and this attitude can apply to corporate policy. MARK HOLTZAPPLE He is a professor of chemical engineering at Texas A & M University. He is a paradigm of an environmentally conscious engineer. He decided to commit his research agenda to developing energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies. 9.1 INTRODUCTION: It’s known that engineers have a complex relationship to the environment. On the one hand they have helped to produce some of the environmental problems that plague human society. On the other hand, engineers can design projects, products, and processes that reduce or eliminate these some threats to environmental integrity. 9.2 WHAT DO THE CODES SAY ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT? Many engineering codes make no reference to the environment at all, but increasingly they are adopting some environmental provisions. In 1977 when they include for the first time the statement that “Engineers should be committed to improve the environment to enhance the quality of life.” Since then the codes refer to the environment more. The codes environment statements fall into two categories, which they refer to as requirements and recommendations. 9.3 THE ENVIRONMENT IN LAW AND COURT DECISIONS: CLEANING UP THE ENVIRONMENT Most environmental laws are directed toward producing a cleaner environment. In 1969, congress passed the National Environmental Policy Act, which may will be the most important
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