Roy老师的SAT阅读修è&

Roy老师的SAT阅读修è&

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: myths/Anaheim léfi$§iifififigfil§3¢$%, WE—RE,€§KE$j<§Rt$fiiaEP Egléfi$§iififig$%?& JEEP/{TEE gfifil‘fi'fififi TSAT%HFFHEi5fi%%§§W—gléfiaiii 331%? M-W$fl¢l EI‘JWF/EfiX, WEE Slippigfiifflfifizxr, i§%%l¥éflilfili§§, fiaE§>i9€Et¢fiB—Eé%§lfnl%t$¥ifitfiéémfi. fif‘z‘fi? Elli! bf)": ,. \ FF E. ‘ ‘ , EUE fiat $ M-Wféx I flflfl‘lfi’lfifl HallmMetaphorfiflE—ftttflfit, EX Ffitlsflfiiifl, lflfitfiffil’fiffiTE’flflfiufifia compressed simile)o EfilfifE—W$W exten %WflE%—$WL, Mfi'fifiiiéliiflx E ded iéTiZIJillgiRHH$fiE istaisamasim metap Mill]: hor, metaphor: a figure of speech in which a IWhat will parents do without the metap word or phrase literally denoting one kind H: electronic baby—sitter? (§fl%3§fifilfi$ H: metaph horica of object or idea is used in place of "$1 / W, stag/AW? )lfgfiillfififlfi mm. | 11another to suggest a likeness or analogy Hg T$¥fl$flfififilfiffio langu between them (as in drowning in money); “A c... while most of us are only too age, broadly speaking, equivalent to H” ready to apply to others the cold wind figurat “figurative language” of criticism, we are somehow reluctant ive to give our fellows the warm sunshine langu of praise.( .... ulflxEéij‘zll‘FP Efiffl’ézxiifi age E'uif’éfillkfttfifiqfé‘fls fi'fi3FJE7EiZ’éEE. E14] IE ffffiattfi Emilia ‘ ’ a )l’ffitfltttfitt 1’99 lit, tflfit/fittl’fifaflfimfflfi‘é, iii]le %! hi0 exten analogy: inference that if two or more tl: analog ded 5 things agree with one another in some 3% flfifiy analo respects they will probably agree in H: gy others afina(5imile)afiflfithé—ft%fi$~ Raf fiflfi’fllfi‘fifiifi: ELIEfffiEfilfif$ TEE§$W§JE$fl§Ri£fifitt , fiHHZlWMD "filZlSE‘JE‘E’ZfI, fifififififittqltflfll—L fl E$l§fi%“Al%B”, fifiifi’flttflfiififias, like, as if, as though%o Elfin: oHejumped back as if he had been stung, and the blood rushed into his wrinkled face.(lmEE—EJE, elem “ll/AKREUTT—Tlfilfi’fl, lflfififififfiififilfi H: simile: a figure of speech comparing two EH fifi’flflfifififlfififififlo )E «51%?» — "fisimile 3 unlike things that is often introduced by "A I¢%Afi“fi”fifi’ll§l%fi%fifilifififlfi U like or as (as in cheeks like roses) H" WEEUTfl—fis iifiifiglllfiltfl_/l\§i fig}? Wlbfiflflfigflifi’fl fil'l$%kl§l’\]lt3 oThe cheque fluttered to the floor like a bird with a broken wing. (figjgflfii fiiflifii, lg—RWTflflafiE’fl/bgo ) «KW» —§‘Ul3, %i§i<§iglf\+j< if, kid L$§KBWR1 figfik—Efii 3%: l¢%fflfififii¥%ttlffifi7flfimil\ E, hfifiifififitflfitifl%i{ifi%5§ K, fligl‘filbmrblfio 48 meanfififix was; as a q: E ‘ I sua- arm s “WW I flflfi‘ififififl literar y allusio n: politic al aHUSiO allusion:an implied or indirect reference fiallusion n 7 especially in literature or the use of such r9fere references noes to the truths expre ssed by myths $5. underst El: atemen 7 12 fit} understate: to represent as less than is the case Elfin? %‘§t€(Hyperbole)zEé—$¢fifil§§ififi fifié‘ifitfidélflififiéfi, liabilng tfl$lflifififittiaifiimfia fiflfiitlli‘si: Extsififiilél’fllg‘fififio fifitfigfilufi lléfigifi’iiflfittl, 35%Et’fi, was is; Zaii'aEEJTifiillx fiflfilfl’flfilfio l§l l]: oVingo sat stunned, looking at the oak tree. It was covered with yellow handkerchiefs—20 of them, 30 of them, maybe hundreds.(§‘di§éi’£3§l5JL E exagge hyper 2 exaggerate: to enlarge beyond bounds or %‘ EfiifilfiilfifiTo NifiifiTfiiifi Eration bole the truth, or overstate flit ——:+%, E+%l EJZithLfifjfi )ttl: 4:74:20 of them, 30 of them, maybe hundredsfifimfifiT§§K39¥ifia I351 ifl§E%T%’a§io oShe gave me the impression of having more teeth, white and large and even, than were necessary for any practical purpose.(filfl£’éfil§lfiEfl’§‘KEi fill} fi—D%E%§tfi’ak§f, i'aéi'izfigéafl filflflsfifli$¥a )Efiil’rfififlé‘fitfi Emil-tit, 1E5 —/i\‘jai"§l‘§fi¥fl2 Eafi'lfiiié’éfifli 49 RoyEfiSATl‘filiififX file??? fifth tbfi. ,. . EFI a , gm 3% $ M-Wféx I eastwarle flJA(Personification)7.EéfE!A§‘é [341% f$litn$9l~§f~$ffllb faiZNiM meets. Elfin: 0... four evergreen shrubs stood at each corner, where they struggled to survive the dust and fumes from a busy personification: attribution of personal main road.( .... ..&7%£§E7Ffifilllfi¥ M personi 5 qualities, especially the representation of M ’I‘figfia Elllfiflfififififi'l‘tfi’gjfiifl: Afication a thing or abstraction as a person or by A fli§lEElfJ$l<EL fifLEifiTfio )“f$?L"xEé the human form fiififi’fl‘ffllfiimifll’fia l/Efii‘é‘fii’fiMi‘E fifi‘fiT’ifi, @ENWJQ oBut the houses were cold, closed, unfriendly.(filz%fifilii5fia¥3éfii 1%, [7?ng —fifl$7§fi¥o )house Axes-teases, l’E‘aEiEiiflllAEl’aiF 3%, fifflfia¥$km>éfifiilao appeal to emotion: instead of facts, appeal persuasive language is used to develop iii iii to 4 the foundation of an appeal to emotion— 11% 1% emotio based argument. Thus, the validity of the Eli? n premises that establish such an argument 1% does not prove to be verifiable. appeal to reason: instead of speculation or emotions, reasoning or deduction is iii . appeal lfito 1 used as the main device of 11% ii reason understanding something, so the E conclusion is based on reasoning and ‘IZJE thus verifiable fiifiléfiironyfifiEifilifi, Ffilifi MififlEifiifiEEMT-fifgo fiftllg‘filgfif Ffiflfiiififlflfll, lE§7§tEfifi§l€i€i£—ft fifimfifitfilfifi, tifafilittl—‘fizleefifi liE‘Jii-fi, 15M]: oSlowly the old lady stooped to pick it (the cheque) up. Her present, her lovely present. With trembling fingers she tore it into little bits. (%7k7k irony: the use of words to express something other than and especially the ififlgf’fififififlo )%xj<'j\+§%h§ IEirony 4 opposite of the literal meaning and ii WEE gtflifififiggfiflfiligggfi 52‘ sometimes a usually humorous or 1% fifigéfififigfimfimlb fifififififléémfl sardonic literary style or form Efifim_fiéégjkflm’§§é, characterized by irony E%AID§EWL%° flfitfiher lovely presentfififlfifiirony, Efiliifio oShe was not so young as I expected and in appearance imposing rather than attractive.(§[fl#$fiflfif§% Elfii‘ilS/Afffiéo mmarassmwalx. $fiflififi$kfil§o )imposingféf'a‘lilfig 5M?» ifélilsflfilEJxEfl’é‘Kifiill, l’E'aEELtl: Lfilflfllfif Ell] l3 Wfikafi—mfiflifififllfl Hilflél’flévko paradox: a statement that is seemingly IE parado contradictory or opposed to common % Eix sense and yet is perhaps true on a more 1% profound level 50 FloyElfiSATl‘filiifiiX *llé‘ta‘r? ElliJ tbfi ElJ 7: / »-. \ _ ,. \ gfi ‘ ‘ I l euphemism: the substitution of an i IEeuphe 3 agreeable or inoffensive expression for m E mism one that may offend or suggest xi something unpleasant In . compare: the act or process of explic . . . representing one thing or person as ti: compar it . . . ti: Eison comp 3 Similar to or like another, or an K . examination of two or more items to ariS0n . .. .. ... .. establish Similarities and diSSimilaritieS ti: contras contrast:compare or appraise in respect 39‘ 55H to differences fifi flashback: interruption of chronological Htlflashba sequence (as in a film or literary work) by W . 2 . . . . |Efl ck interjection of events of earlier IE! occurrence cliche: 1. a trite phrase or expression; 2. a [525: hackneyed theme, characterization, or C art I. h 1 .t . _ fl lac ic e Si uation, I I 3%,]; 3. something (as a menu item) that has ifi become overly familiar or commonplace u . digression: to turn aside especially from + fijg'gress ‘l the main subject of attention or course of % |Eflion fl argument Eparallel ara“ parallel structure: having identical ; Estructu :Iism ‘l syntactical elements in corresponding ii re positions 1% Erepetiti 1 repetition: to express or present (oneself) ii Eon again in the same words, terms, or form “E rhetorical questioning: A rhetorical question is a figure of Speech in the form of a question posed for its persuasive effect without the expectation of a reply (e.g.: "Why me?") Rhetorical questions encourage the listener to think about Ii 1 what the (often obvious) answer to the question must be. When a speaker states, "How much longer must our people endure this injustice?", no formal answer is expected. Rather, it iS a device used by the speaker to assert or deny something. wordplay: verbal wit; a literary technique in which the words that are used become the main subject of the work. Puns, phonetic mix—ups such as SpoonerismS, obscure words and meanings, clever rhetorical excurSionS, oddly formed 35 sentences, and telling character names 5? are common examples of word play.Word 3}}? play is quite common in oral cultureS aS a 352 method of reinforcing meaning.ExampleS of visual orthographic and sound—based word play abound in both alphabetically and non—alphabetically written literature (e.g. Chinese). rhetori fl cal E2 questio ning Iwordpl 3 ay 51 RoyEfiSATl‘filiififX ESATE’J Rhetorical Device QuestionFFI, Efiillifitlfifill7F"R§E—1§z=§fifiéfiaiififiqfilgljfi, E f$%$ifl—1§#7F%PE fiXiE’fl’WfiEfi‘fiifi", R EfiiljfififififiifiifififififilfiWET/Ed: ifi"(fi\$lg‘fi$fiflfi$fll%fi$¥ifizlEfl Efl—l’éffifi, ETHZEERhetorical Device Questioné‘ffi'flfi fl). Riflziil‘ifi’fliilfi, i’fiaaifii‘flfifiTfiiiiflsfiifififlfiXflfifiifl‘Efi’flWfii sass sass g away miss personal experience, personal information, ersonal . . anecdote: a usuall short narrative of an interestin , :necdote Pel89na' ".‘S'th' 14 amusing, or biograyphical incident. 9 «KAW? individual ihSight, personal voice historical citation, historical historical contextualization, 6 analyze: to study or determine the nature and Eiéfifi analysis historical fact, relationship of the parts of by analysis historical research, historical sources generalization broad generalization 3 generalize: the action of deriving or inducing (a fig general conception or principle) from particulars hypothetical musing! hypotheSIze: an assumption or concessmn made for hypothetical . the sake of argument or an interpretation of a 3 TL . hypothetical 4 . . . . . {flux assumption . . practical Situation or condition taken as the ground scenario, conjecture . for action humor humorous anecdote 2 humor: that quality which appeals to a sense of the flgfi ludicrous or absurdly incongruous . . . qualification: a restriction in meaning or application : qual'flcat'on 2 a limiting modification BEWJ scholarly . . scholarly: of, characteristic of, or suitable to learned is, t analyses SChOIarly crlthues 2 persons, equivalent with academic 117M”)? scientific data: factual information (as measurements or 3 statistics) used as a basis for reasoning, discussion, flifiiffi or calculation observation, sociological analysis, statistical evidence technical 'ar on:the technical terminolo orcharacteristic , H 19 9V fififis scientific data . term, terminology 2 . . . . . jargon idiom of a speCIal actiwty or group _ . _ . . ig a: auditory visual imagery 2 auditory. of, relating to, or experienced through Ill-"Mina '5 descriptions hearing If Visual. of, relating to, or used in VISIon . accusation: to charge with a fault or offense, or :13: .52.: accusfltlon 1 equivalent to blame JED—Jam apology: a formal justification, or an admission of error or discourtesy accompanied by an expression A“; i flp°|°gy.flnd 1 of regret ffconfession: to tell or make known (as Wfifin F' confession . . . Ei something wrong or damaging to oneself), equwalent with admit authority and i authority: an individual or an institution cited or filififllfi hypothesis appealed to as an expert is? bibliographic bibliographic: the history, identification, or description , fa _ . 1 . . . . Ifi1E/ux Information of writings or publications 52 E l’E$ifi disclaimer and assertion dramatic statement eloquent musing embarrassing revelation interpretation of symbols invocation and definition paraphrase presentation of abstract principles rebuttal and analysis inquiry omen offer an example direct quotation filmiiéit prediction quote an expert, quotation from specific text, citation, direct citation, direct literary citation if)“: $ 1 7 RoyEfiSATl‘SfiiififX M-Wfifié disclaimer: denial, disavowal ff assertion: to state or declare positively and often forcefully or aggressively dramatic: striking in appearance or effect muse: to become absorbed in thought, especially to turn something over in the mind meditatively and often inconclusively embarrassing: to cause to experience a state of self- conscious distress H revelation: something that is revealed, especially an enlightening or astonishing disclosure interpretation: to explain or tell the meaning of, equivalent with present in understandable terms invocation: a calling upon for authority or justification ff definition: to determine or identify the essential qualities or meaning of paraphrase: a restatement of a text, passage, or work giving the meaning in another form present: to show, or to offer to view rebut: to expose the falsity of, to refute inquiry: a request for information omen: an occurrence or phenomenon believed to portend a future event offer an example: equivalent with exemplify and illustrate, to make clear by giving or by serving as an example or instance quote: to speak or write (a passage) from another usually with credit acknowledgment llcite: to quote by way of example, authority, or proof 53 $3t$ffi 7K |:| mil if En H IE 33: ME? E ,EExfi‘ESl-% ram ifli’éfiflfi Efiflfi iii 1% [EU PirJlS é‘éfil EllFfi ...
View Full Document

Page1 / 6

Roy&egrave;€&aring;&cedil;ˆ&ccedil;š„SAT&eacute;˜…&egrave;&macr;&raquo;&auml;&iquest;&reg;&egrave;&

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online