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Turbocharging the IC Engine

Turbocharging the IC Engine - Turbocharging the I.C Engine...

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Turbocharging the I.C. Engine Guest Lecture for ME 444 Internal Combustion Engines Dr. Philip S. Keller BorgWarner Inc. Engine Systems Group
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Outline Introduction Turbochargers Thermodynamic Analysis Compressor Turbine Intercoolers Benefits Challenges New Developments Conclusions
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Introduction History 1885 and 1896, Gottlieb Daimler and Rudolf Diesel experiment with pre-compressing intake air 1925 Swiss engineer Albert Buchi develops first exhaust gas turbocharger which increases power output by 40% 1938 first commercial Diesel truck application by “Swiss Machine Works Sauer” 1962 first production application of turbochargers in passenger cars - the Chevrolet Monza Corvair and the Oldsmobile Jetfire
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Introduction History 1970’s – first oil crisis and increasingly stringent air emission regulations lead to demands for higher power density as well as higher air delivery. Outcome -> virtually all current truck engines are turbocharged. 1978 Mercedes-Benz puts the 300 SD into production marking the appearance of the first turbocharged Diesel passenger car 1994 VW introduces the variable geometry turbo in their TDI Diesel engine significantly improving the transient response of the Diesel engine.
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Introduction – Engine Power Why boost? Definitions 2 N/ V ρ η m SW a vol a = f f f m Q P η = V ρ m a a = fuel of rate flow mass fuel of value heating Q power P speed engine N me swept volu V efficiency c volumetri rate flow c volumetri V density air air of rate flow mass f SW a = = = = = = = = = f a a m m η ρ
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Introduction – Engine Power Power is basically a function of three things (listed in order of least expensive first): 1. Swept volume 2. Engine speed 3. Air density -> boosting = AFR Q N V P f f SW a vol 1 2 η ρ η
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Introduction – SI Engine Power Density Power Density for gasoline engines is basically a function of two things: 1. Engine speed Possible for SI engines, but more expensive and somewhat less responsive 1. Air density -> boosting = AFR Q V P f f vol SW 1 2 η η N ρ a
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