lecture_2011_09_01b

lecture_2011_09_01b - Michigan State University College of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Harold Schock, Michigan State University Mixtures and Solutions Mixtures and Solutions Harold Schock Michigan State University Michigan State University College of Engineering College of Engineering Fall 2011 - ME444
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Harold Schock, Michigan State University The mole fraction y i of component i is defined as n i = no. of moles of i n = total moles in mixture Similarly mass fraction m i = mass of component i m = total mass in mixture n n y i i = m m mf i i = Mixtures of Ideal Gases Mixtures of Ideal Gases
Background image of page 2
Harold Schock, Michigan State University What Properties Can We Measure? What Properties Can We Measure? Mass Volume e Temperatur Pressure We could have tables to determine the properties of the mixture, but we would prefer to be able to derive properties from the pure substances that comprise the mixture.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Harold Schock, Michigan State University One Exception: One Exception: Air tables which are based on the following composition: %MoleBasis Nitrogen 78.10 Oxygen 20.95 Argon 0.92 CO 2 +trace 0.03
Background image of page 4
Harold Schock, Michigan State University In general, properties of mixtures In general, properties of mixtures are defined as partial molal properties. are defined as partial molal properties. For example let’s examine the internal energy of the gases A + B shown above where denotes the partial molal internal energy. Similar equations can be developed for other properties. B B A A U n U n U + = mix U
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Harold Schock, Michigan State University Two models are used in conjunction with mixtures of gases, namely the Dalton Model Dalton Model and the Amagat Model Amagat Model . Dalton Model Dalton Model : Properties of each component are considered as each component existed separately at the volume and temperature of the mixture.
Background image of page 6
Harold Schock, Michigan State University Dalton Model Dalton Model Temperature = T Temperature = T Pressure = P A Pressure = P B Gas A Volume V Gas B Volume V
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Harold Schock, Michigan State University Ideal Gas Dalton Model
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 31

lecture_2011_09_01b - Michigan State University College of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online