9 Chiasson et al._2010_HIV prevention and care in the digital age

9 Chiasson et al._2010_HIV prevention and care in the digital age

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: S UPPLEMENT A RTICLE HIV Prevention and Care in the Digital Age Mary Ann Chiasson, DrPH,* Sabina Hirshfield, PhD,* and Cornelis Rietmeijer, MD, PhD Objectives: To describe the technologic advances in the digital media, including computers, mobile phones, and the Internet, that have greatly expanded opportunities to deliver evidence-based HIV education, prevention, and treatment programs. Methods: This article examines the use of digital media in the United States and its potential role in HIV prevention and care. Results: Although the digital divide is shrinking, access varies by age, race/ethnicity, and education. The Internet is an important medium for delivering universal and targeted HIV education and prevention, especially for men who have sex with men, who report going online to seek health information online and for social and sexual networking. Online and off-line behavioral interventions using digital media range from computerized multimedia interventions that take into account individual behaviors to brief untailored video interventions. Numerous Web sites facilitate access to care by providing a variety of services, including location of and linkage to HIV testing and treatment sites. HIV treatment and adherence programs that use online medical records text messaging, paging, and tablet computerbased counseling tools are also being developed. Conclusions: HIV prevention and care programs using digital media have great potential to cost-effectively meet the complex needs of diverse and often underserved populations living with or at high risk of HIV. Key Words: HIV, Internet, prevention, sexually transmitted infection, computer technology, MSM ( J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2010;55:S94S97) INTRODUCTION Technologic advances in digital media, including com- puters, mobile phones, and the Internet, have revolutionized the way we communicate with each other, both personally and professionally. The transformation of the Internet from Web 1.0 as a unidirectional information source to the interactive and participatory Web 2.0 has important implications for HIV transmission, HIV education and prevention, and medical management of HIV. The Internets borderless geographic and demographic social networks and equally limitless possibilities for interventions have the potential to change both community norms and individual behavior cost-effectively. DISCUSSION Whos Online In 2010, most adults (77%) and nearly all teenagers (93%) in the United States are online. 1,2 Overall, 41% of Americans use social networking sites with the greatest use (75%) reported by those between 18 and 29 years of age. 1 This group also leads in the use of mobile phones (94%) and texting: 88% text, and of these, 80% texted a median of 20 times during the past 24 hours....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course HUMBIO 156 at Stanford.

Page1 / 4

9 Chiasson et al._2010_HIV prevention and care in the digital age

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online